Course Description and Credit Information

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Course Description:

This course explores the importance of urban soil in landscape architecture and the potential of nature-based solutions for rehabilitating and enhancing soil functions in urban environments. Participants will examine the concept of nature-based solutions (NBS) and their application in restoring degraded soil and improving soil quality. The course will delve into the bioremediation capacity of grasses and their suitability for planting in urban areas, as well as propose technological solutions for their practical application. Additionally, the course will address the significance of urban soil security and the role of soils in sustainable urban planning.

Learning Objectives:

1. Attendees will understand the bioremediation capacity of grasses and their suitability for planting in urban areas to improve soil quality and reduce pollution.

2. Attendees will understand  the relationship between soil connectivity and sustainable urban planning, including the integration of soils in planning guidelines and policies.

3. Attendees will learn about the impact of urbanization on soil pollution and the potential of the COVID-19 pandemic period as a tool for investigating pollution sources.

General Course Information

Credits 3 CEU/CE/PH/CH
HSW Yes
Format PDF files that can be downloaded and audio files that read the pdf content if you prefer audio

 

Course preview:

Abstract: The rehabilitation and restoration of land-based ecosystems is a key strategy for recovering the services (goods and resources) ecosystems offer to humankind. The use of nature-based solutions (NBSs) to restore degraded soil functions and improve soil quality can be a sustainable and successful strategy to enhance their ecosystem services by working together with the forces of nature and using well-designed measures that require less maintenance, are more cost-effective, and if constructed in the right way may even be more effective over long periods because nature’s forces can increase the structural efficiency. In this study, we aimed to (i) evaluate the bioremediation capacity of some grasses and their suitability for lawn planting in settlements (in residential and non-residential areas, along roads, etc.) and (ii) propose technological solutions for their practical application in an urban environment. Emphasis was placed on the potential of some perennial grasses and their application for the bioremediation of polluted urban soils, including perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), crested wheatgrass (Agropyron cristatum L.), tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb), and bird’s foot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus L.). A case study from the city of Plovdiv (Bulgaria) is presented, together with an effective technological solution for the establishment of urban lawns and the roadside green buffer patches.